The Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Model for Understanding RAS Proteins

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The Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Model for Understanding RAS Proteins

Terça, 07.05.2019

It was published an updated critical literature review on human and yeast RAS pathways, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. Moreover, it was also adressed the contribution of studying yeast RAS pathways for the understanding of human RAS and how this model organism can contribute to unveil the roles of RAS oncoproteins in the regulation of mechanisms important in the tumorigenic process, like autophagy.


Giulia Cazzanelli1, Flávia Pereira 1,2,3, Sara Alves 1,2,4, Rita Francisco1, Luísa Azevedo1,2,4,5, Patrícia Dias Carvalho1,2,4, Ana Almeida1, Manuela Côrte-Real1, Maria José Oliveira2,3, Cândida Lucas1, Maria João Sousa1 and Ana Preto1

1 CBMA—Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology, Department of Biology, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal;

2 Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen 208, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal;

3 Tumour and Microenvironment Interactions Group, INEB-Institute for Biomedical Engineering, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal

4 IPATIMUP-Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Rua Júlio Amaral de Carvalho 45, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal;

5 Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre S/N, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal


The exploitation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a biological model for the investigation of complex molecular processes conserved in multicellular organisms, such as humans, has allowed fundamental biological discoveries. When comparing yeast and human proteins, it is clear that both amino acid sequences and protein functions are often very well conserved. One example of the high degree of conservation between human and yeast proteins is highlighted by the members of the RAS family. Indeed, the study of the signaling pathways regulated by RAS in yeast cells led to the discovery of properties that were often found interchangeable with RAS proto-oncogenes in human pathways, and vice versa. In this work, we performed an updated critical literature review on human and yeast RAS pathways, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. Moreover, we emphasized the contribution of studying yeast RAS pathways for the understanding of human RAS and how this model organism can contribute to unveil the roles of RAS oncoproteins in the regulation of mechanisms important in the tumorigenic process, like autophagy.

Cells

https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4409/7/2/14